Status Of Forces Agreement Example

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At a November 26, 2007 press conference on the declaration, General Douglas Lute, presidential assistant for Iraq and Afghanistan, said the government did not foresee a forward-looking agreement with Iraq that “would have formal treaty status that would then lead us to formal negotiations or formal contributions from Congress.” White House Office of the Press Secretary, Press Gaggle by Dana Perino and General Douglas Lute, Presidential Assistant for Iraq and Afghanistan, 26 November 2007, available from georgewbush-whitehouse.archives.gov/news/releases/2007/11/20071126-6.html. The security agreement contains other rules and requirements not traditionally found in U.S. SOFAs, including provisions for combat operations by U.S. forces. Operations in the U.S. The forces under the agreement must be approved by the Iraqi government and coordinated with the Iraqi authorities through a joint military operations coordination committee. U.S. armed forces can also arrest or arrest people in connection with operations conducted under the agreement. More broadly, the security agreement provides for “strategic consultations” between the parties in the event of an external or internal threat or aggression against Iraq and provides that the United States, as mutually agreed by the parties, “shall take appropriate measures, including diplomatic, economic or military measures,” to deter the threat. In 1941, the United States entered into an agreement with the United Kingdom on the lease of naval and air bases to Newfoundland, Bermuda, Jamaica, St. Lucia, Antigua, Trinidad and British Guiana.146 The agreement not only described the physical location that was leased, but also provided for the status of U.S. personnel on the leased site.

Although the rental agreement is not a stand-alone SOFA, it was intended to obtain a SOFAS on the sites indicated. In the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s, the United States and the United Kingdom entered into additional lease agreements that included status protection provisions on leased sites. 1956: Agreement on the Status of the United States. . . .